MAKING A ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND
Cloth Doll
Background Information

There are two different types of traditional dolls made on St. Lawrence Island: those made to sell (specifically to collectors), and those made for children to play with. The dolls in this curriculum are modeled after children's traditional clothing on St. Lawrence Island, which were generally made from reindeer fawn skin.

Brief Description

This unit is designed for adults and for students in grades 9-12.

You will need two weeks to complete the doll.

This doll reflects traditional clothing worn by children on St. Lawrence Island (the two villages of Gambell and Savoonga). The patterns are user friendly, making it simple to learn to complete your first doll.

DESIRED OUTCOMES

OVERARCHING UNDERSTANDINGS

1. Dolls serve as models for people, both in their clothing and the behavior their owners give them.
2. The art of doll-making requires technical skill and artistry.
3. Playing with dolls is a way for children to learn to become
adults.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

1. Why are dolls important playthings?
2. What kinds of dolls did the St. Lawrence Islanders traditionally
play with?
3. What can dolls teach us about the culture of St. Lawrence Island?

KNOWLEDGE: STUDENTS WILL KNOW:

1. materials used in St. Lawrence Island dolls;
2. traditional seasonal clothing worn by St. Lawrence Islanders;
3. the difference between dolls made for play and dolls made for sale;
4. vocabulary

SKILLS: STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO:

1. compare and contrast traditional Native and Western dolls;
2. identify types of traditional and historical Native clothing for
different occasions;
3. make a St. Lawrence Island-style baby doll.

Buy the complete curriculum and patterns

Check out the other activities:

Lydia Apatiki Sewing

The creation of this curriculum was supported by Kawerak, Inc., First Peoples Fund, CIRI Foundation, Bering Sea Lions Club, Partnow Consulting, and Gales Communications and Design. We are thankful to those who assisted in the coordination and development of the curriculum: Alice Bioff, Patricia Partnow, George Stransky, Carol Gales, Lisa Ellanna, Colleen Reynolds, Tanya Wongittilin, Vera Metcalf, B. Yaayuk Alvanna Stimpfle, Dianne (Igluquq) Okleasik, Donna James, and Patti Lillie. We are also very grateful for the approval and support from the Native Community of Gambell.